Flymall Wheels & Wings July 2022 Newsletter

Written on July 29, 2022 at 1:21 pm, by hkraemer

Welcome to the Kraemer Aviation/Flymall.org Wheels & Wings Newsletter.

This month its all about the drive or the journey – getting there (the people, the machine, the journey)! Including scenic routes, awesome boating trips, flying to Oshkosh, rowing around the world, and more.

You can view past newsletters here.

This month, many pilots around the world are converging on Oshkosh.

Here’s a shot of some warbirds flying into Oshkosh.

The arrival path into Oshkosh. Every pilot needs to experience this at least once in their life. It is an awesome experience. There is so much to see and do.

This month is about the journey and July happens to be the month that in 1969, a spaceship took off from earth heading to the moon to have the first humans walk on the moon. The ultimate journey. Apollo 11 (July 16–24, 1969) was the American spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC, and Armstrong became the first person to step onto the Moon’s surface six hours and 39 minutes later, on July 21 at 02:56 UTC. Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later, and they spent about two and a quarter hours together exploring the site they had named Tranquility Base upon landing. Armstrong and Aldrin collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth as pilot Michael Collins flew the Command Module Columbia in lunar orbit, and were on the Moon’s surface for 21 hours, 36 minutes before lifting off to rejoin Columbia.

Earlier this month, Kraemer Aviation hosted their annual 4th of July cookout and car show. We had vintage bicycles to ride, vintage motorcycle rides, great food, swimming, and more. A great time has had by all that attended. Click here for more pictures and videos from the event.


Interested in living at an airport?  Visit our Aviation Real Estate page here. You can view price data for airport property in our Market Watch section of the Flymall. Here is the data for all airport property. You can refine the search by “state” simply by searching for the desired state under “Model”. We currently have a nice grass strip for sale in Carroll County Maryland. Click here for details. On August 21st, Kraemer Aviation Real Estate is hosting a fly-in at Keymar Airport. Free food! Click here for information on the Fly-In and Open House.

Want to have your business highlighted on the Flymall???  We offer inexpensive rates to have your business featured on our Wheels & Wings page.  Contact us for more info.

History Trivia: Did you know that Alice Huyler Ramsey, the first woman to drive across the US. She did this trip in 1909. On June 9, 1909, this 22-year-old housewife and mother began a 3,800-mile journey from Hell Gate in Manhattan, New York, to San Francisco, California, in a green, four-cylinder, 30-horsepower Maxwell DA. The trip took 59 days. They arrived amid great fanfare on August 7, 1909.

Alice Ramsey with her Maxwell

Ramsey had always loved the open road. Her husband, John Ramsey, had gifted her a Maxwell Touring Car in 1908, and she became a common sight driving all over New Jersey. Very few women drove cars at this time, and Ramsey’s enthusiasm and composure behind the wheel caught the eye of some local Maxwell dealers. It was then that the Maxwell Company approached the Ramsey’s with the idea to let Alice drive one of their cars across the country. The company wanted to prove that not only was their vehicle durable, but was also easy to operate and repair. Maxwell provided her a car, covered all the expenses and alerted dealers and media about the trip. 

Six years before Alice Ramsey made her trip, in 1903, George Wyman became the first person to make a transcontinental voyage across the United States by motor-vehicle. And he did it on a 1905 Yale California motorcycle. Wyman made the trip from San Francisco to New York City in 51 days. His motorcycle only had 1 and 1/4 horsepower. He is pictured here with the bike that made this incredible journey.

If riding a motorcycle across the country isn’t a long enough ride for you, check-out this journey. The longest road in the world to walk, is from Cape Town (South Africa) to Magadan (Russia). No need for planes or boats, there are bridges. It’s a 22,387 kilometers (13911 miles) and it takes 4,492 hours to travel. It would be 187 days walking nonstop, or 561 days walking 8 hours a day. Along the route, you pass through 17 countries, six time zones and all seasons of the year. Amazing!!!

If you enjoy history, we have a new aviation history fact each day at the bottom of our webpages.  Some days there may be more than one, just refresh the page.  And if you like Beatles history, checkout our Events Calendar and select the Beatles category.  This is a work in progress, we’re building the most comprehensive calendar of important dates in Beatle history.  For those that like to stick with current news, we have an aviation news ticker on our home page.  This is updated daily to show the current aviation news.

Achievements & Special Recognition: Earlier this month, Akhil passed his private pilot checkride today with Harry. He did an outstanding job. Near perfect on all maneuvers. He did this just a few weeks after his 17th birthday. Now he can fly a plane by himself anywhere in the world, however he still cannot drive a car by himself. His instructor was Tal Sabag. Harry did her CFI checkride just over a year ago. Her two most recent applicants both did outstanding. Way to go Akhil and Tal. Akhil plans to study aeronautical engineering in college and design planes one day.

Instructors, what to highlight your students first solo or other achievement here?  Just send us a short write-up and a picture or two and we’ll post it here for you.  Click here for our contact info.

Aviation/Aviators in the news: In the early 1990s, Harry had a student that was involved in a historic and record setting trip. A 16 year old Jimmy Mathis flew from coast to coast as a student pilot. He was the first student pilot ever to make such a trip and the youngest certificated pilot to do such a trip. Click here for an article written about this amazing trip.

Harry’s friend, Kathrin Kaiser from Germany made an incredible journey from Germany to Oshkosh earlier this month. She did this by herself in her single engine Grumman. What an amazing trip.

Here is the start

As of July 11 2022

Here she is as of July 15 2022

Day 22. She had flown 6700nm or 12400km from her home in Germany.

At Oshkosh!

The aviation section of the Flymall is full of aviation news, training info, and much more for the aviator.

Crossing the English Channel can be a challenging journey. How about trying it in a human powered aircraft. The Gossamer Albatross is a human-powered aircraft built by American aeronautical engineer Dr. Paul B. MacCready‘s company AeroVironment. On June 12, 1979, it completed a successful crossing of the English Channel to win the second Kremer prize worth £100,000 (equivalent to £538,000 in 2021). Just before 6 am on June 12, 1979, amateur cyclist and pilot Bryan Allen powered the Albatross to the rehearsed speed of 75 revolutions per minute and took off from a point near Folkestone, England.

Air show season is always just around the corner.  Want to travel to air shows in your own aircraft?  Visit our used aircraft page on the Flymall to view our inventory.

Car/Motorcycle Show News:   Have you ever driven the Tail of the Dragon? The Dragon has 318 curves in just 11 miles. What an awesome ride! It is a ride like no other place in the world. Some of the curves have been given nicknames like: Beginner’s End, Bust Bend, Shade Tree Corner, Hog Pen Bend, Sunset Corner and Mud Corner. There is a resort that has a tree decorated with various motorcycle parts lost in crashes on The Dragon. If you drive it, be careful.

The Laytonsville Cruise In is the place to be on a Friday night in Montgomery County.  The Laytonsville Cruise In was started by Harry in 2010. It has become one of the most popular cruise ins in the area. You can follow Harry on Facebook for daily updates during the many shows and events he attends.

The Laytonsville Cruise In July 15 2022 Award Night was amazing. Great weather, great awards, and lots of new folks with their cars showed up. Click here for more pictures of the July 15 award night. Here’s what we’re doing for 2022:

For 2022, we will have guest judges each month. We will have a first & second place award each month and a Best Of Show award. The judges will pick their choice for a first and second place award and based on the schedule below, the themed car for that month will have a Best Of Show selected. We will also have a special award for the “Best Original Vehicle”, sponsored by Mel Short. The first and second place awards will be selected from ALL cars that night. The judges may give out other special awards as well. We will also have some awards for the kids that bring something cool to show off. And starting in July 2022, we will have a special award sponsored by Bingo – The Saints of Kulture’s Choice Award. We will also have a TFR Choice Award each month. This award will be selected by The Family Room.

Here’s what is coming up for award night:

August 19 2022 – Corvette night – Best Of Show Award for a Corvette
September 16 2022 – Imports – Best Of Show Award for Imports
October 21 2022 – British Cars – Best Of Show Award for a British Car

Here are some of the award winners from July 15. Debbie was one of the award winners from July. Debbie and her 1977 Corvette won the Mel Short award for the Best Original Vehicle. Debbie has a great story to go with this very nice Corvette. Debbie ordered this car new back in 1977. Click here to read Debbie’s (in her own words) full story on her and this 1977 Corvette.

Harry’s friend, Lauren was also an award winner in July. Way to go Lauren.

Our Events Calendar has the most current info regarding local and national car shows, air shows, and more.  With nearly 30 categories, there is something for everyone.  The Day Tripper section of the Flymall has dozens of day trip ideals and interesting places to visit.  Check it out here.

Since this month is all about the journey, did you know that the first transcontinental trucking delivery started on July 12 1916. William Warwick left Seattle on July 12 1916 driving a GMC 1 1/2 ton truck carrying evaporated milk heading to New York.

Harry attended the District Harley Davidson Bike Night on July 14. This is a monthly event. A very cool event with food, music, and of course motorcycles. Click here for more pictures from the July bike night.

The Flymall team attended the Harley Davidson of Frederick Motorcycle Show. This show was to benefit the Hogs and Heroes Foundation. It was a great show with vendors, food, live band, and more. Click here for more pictures.

The AC took first place at the Harley Davidson of Frederick show.

As you may know, the Kraemer Aviation/Flymall team enjoys our motorcycles and we have a large collection of rare and unusual motorcycles and bicycles. Our bikes are ridden locally and/or trailered to shows. Grace McDonald is riding her KTM motorcycle around the world. Grace has a very cool story to tell about her journey.

Here is Grace’s story called Destination Everywhere:

It’s 2016, late on a Thursday night, Town Hall Station, Sydney: I’ve just left work and I’m watching rats scurry along the tracks as I wait for my train. I’m exhausted. I’ve been exhausted for a long time. Long days and nights as a corporate lawyer have not brought a fulfilling life, only grey fatigue. I just want to get on my motorcycle and ride away, and not come back.

Six months later, that’s exactly what I do. I pack my worldly possessions into the panniers of my KTM 690 Enduro and I ride out of town and I don’t look back.

I’ve been warned: everyone tells me that as a solo female, I won’t make it. That I am too weak, too vulnerable, too lacking in mechanical qualifications.

First, I ride into the deserts of central Australia, remote regions where I camp beside dry river beds and watch the unbelievably bright stars splash across the sky like milk. Day after day, the corrugated gravel roads bring me peace. People, when I find them, are friendly. They give me oranges from their gardens, fruit cake baked in camp ovens.

I have this idea that I’ll ride to Paris: it’s a long way away, and the route will take me through Asia and up through Iran. I think it will take me 18 months. I am wrong.

I ship my motorcycle into Asia via Timor Leste, the youngest country in the world. I’ve never been to an undeveloped country before; I reclaim my motorcycle from customs and ride through the chaotic streets, out in the villages, wide eyed as dirt tracks take me deep into the interior. This is a country of mountains, and kindness; deeply Catholic but animist in times of trouble; a place of generosity in the face of the fact that 40% of the population are stunted from malnutrition. I stay at convents, with the nuns and schoolgirls; at first they won’t let me in because, when I arrive on my big motorcycle in all my gear, they think I am a man.

Later, in the steam of hotsprings at night, I have a machete stand off with a survivor of the war of independence. He is clearly not well; a living ghost. He stakes out my door, chainsmoking cigarette after cigarette, before he takes his machete and vanishes with his mob of wild dogs, the same way that he came.

The first time I cross a land border – Timor Leste to Indonesia – I am tingling with excitement. Imagine riding around the whole world on your motorcycle. I am addicted.

I fall in love with Indonesia, island hopping for nearly a year, losing myself in a simple version of life which rotates around rice, fish, and family. This is a country where people truly love motorcycles: more than once, I ride into a small town to be greeted by strangers who are waiting for me. How did they know I was coming? The moto family is sprawling and vibrant; the grapevine works formidably.

In Borneo, I cry over a damaged camshaft and replace my rocker arms. In Cambodia I do it again, this time without the tears. On a road in Java I hit the back of a car that stops suddenly, denting the bumper; the driver gets out and apologises and asks that God bless me. In Sulawesi, a car hits me from behind and I go down; but I get up again, and straighten my barkbusters, and don’t complain. Everything works out in the end.

My original timeframe has long passed by the time I talk my way into Vietnam, against all laws and all odds. I ride all the way to the Chinese border, shivering through mountains shrouded with cloud, places where the only warming soup available is made out of pony.

When Covid closes the borders and the music stops, I am in Thailand. Everyone asks me if I will ‘go home’ now, but where is home? The money runs out. My motorcycle is stuck on the wrong side of the Cambodian border.  I am penniless, alone, bereft in the midst of a pandemic.

So I learn to ride enduro, and I learn to speak Thai. Suddenly, my whole world opens up: it turns out that meaning of life is not only motorcycles, but specifically dirt biking. I ride a 2 stroke enduro machine for the first time and I am hooked, and the answers to everything emerge. I start a business with my Thai friends. Now, I run enduro and road tours through the mountains of Northern Thailand between November and February; the rest of the year, I ride the whole world.

Destination? Everywhere.

You can follow Grace’s adventures on www.bikehedonia.com or ride with her in Thailand at www.hivoltmototours.com .

Here is a Question & Answer interview with Grace.

The Flymall team attended District Harley Davidson’s Bikes, Brews, and BBQ event on July 23. The Lomax made the trip uneventfully. Click here for more pictures from the July 23 BBQ. District Harley Davidson hosts a lot of events throughout the year. Checkout their Facebook page for all of their events. You can checkout our schedule of shows we attend here. If you need an appraisal on your classic car or motorcycle, we offer discounts at shows. Click here for information on our appraisals.

In late July, the Flymall team visited the Washington County Rural Heritage Museum in Boonsboro Maryland. They received a private tour by two of their friends. Click here for some pictures of the vehicles in the museum.

Barn Finds/Hangar Finds:  Need an appraisal on your barn find?  Visit our Appraisal Page for information on our appraisals. 

The topic this month is the “Journey”. And he is an interesting “basement crawl-space find” for this month. This collection has an interesting 2 part journey. If you stayed overnight in a motel before the late 1990s, you most likely received a key connected to a large metal or plastic key fob. The initial purpose for these tags, which were primarily made of a heavy metal, were so guests wouldn’t forget to the return them. Harry’s father (Ed Kraemer) was a truck driver. He loved to travel. As a young boy, Harry’s family would take a lot of weekend trips and his father was staying in motels almost daily. Ed started collecting the motel key fobs (back then, they were just referred to a key chains). Ed kept the key fobs in metal coffee cans until the family was able to purchase their own single family home with a basement so Ed had a place to display the collection. Harry helped with putting the key fobs on these boards. Some of the fobs are likely from the 1950s. Ed continued collecting them up to the early 1980s until his health was failing and he could no longer work. After he passed away in 1983, Harry moved away and the collection was lost. As Harry’s aviation career “took-off”, Harry would often think about the collection whenever he stayed in a motel and was given a key fob like in his dad’s collection. Harry did not know the whereabouts of the collection, however, over the years he hoped that one day he would be reunited with it. In 2021, the collection was found and Harry was contacted and asked if he wanted it. Yes! Was the answer. The collection was found in the basement crawl-space of Harry’s childhood home. So after nearly 40 years, the collection that Ed Kraemer started in the 1960s, was reunited with Harry. This collection was a journey collecting them and then being lost for nearly 40 years and then making the journey back to Harry was amazing.

This month we have a couple of Camaro barn finds. This 1967 Camaro had been sitting outside untouched from 1974 to 2004. Then the car was sold to the second owner and packed into a barn until it was recently discovered by a Camaro enthusiasts. Click here for the full story on this awesome find.

The second one is a red 1967 Camaro SS 396 that spent 43 years in a pole barn. They’re out there, you just need to look for them. The story goes like this: The owner parked the Camaro in his pole barn behind his house in Wisconsin in 1975. He had purchased the vehicle in 1972 for just $800.00. He did have plans to restore it, however, life happens, family, etc. In 2018 he decided to pull the car from the barn and sell it. Turns out, it was/is a matching numbers SS 396. We could not find any information on what the car sold for or if he did sell it. This just reinforces the fact that there are gems out there just waiting to be found. Click here for more reading on this barn find.

1967 SS 396

Visit our online store to search for hard to find car parts, aircraft parts, and much more.  You can pay online in our secure store, just click on the Store button on our home page.

Visit the Test Drive section of the Flymall for reviews on automobiles, aircraft, motorcycles, and more. Read about it before you buy it.  You can also research price info on a wide variety of vehicles, collectibles, and more in the Market Watch section of the Flymall. 

If you’re restoring a General Motors barn find, as of July 13 2022, you may be able to get help from general Motors. There are reports that GM has filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for the trademark “GM Restoration.” General Motors has not released any details as of the writing of this newsletter. We’ll need to wait and see with this one.

If you’re restoring a fabric aircraft, Ira Walker of Walker Aviation is your resource.  Visit his page on the Flymall by clicking here

CFI / DPE Notes:  Visit Harry’s Practical Test page for information on his checkrides.  You will also find useful information there to help you prepare for your checkride.  You can also visit Harry’s Lesson Plan section of the Flymall for other flight training information.  Visit our Flight Training page for information on our aviation training classes.

Earlier this month, Elizabeth passed her initial flight instructor checkride with Harry as the DPE. Elizabeth is a very gifted and natural pilot. This was their 4th checkride together. Harry did her private, instrument, commercial, and now her CFI. She did this in her own Cessna 150. She soloed at the age of 17 and had her commercial pilot certificate by the age of 18. She was a commercial pilot before she had her driver’s license. She was able to get paid to fly, however she could not drive herself to the airport. And now, she can teach you to fly an airplane.

Weather in the news: As thousands of planes head for Oshkosh and millions attend this annual show, weather can always be an issue for the last week of July. In fact, some years, it has been referred to as Sloshkosh! Here are a few pictures taken this year of the storms there.

Planes need to be tied down and very secure before these mid summer storms arrive.

Here’s one that wasn’t so lucky.

The storms usually make for a beautiful sunset.

Three Wheel Association (TWA):  Harry started the Three Wheel Association in 2013 to promote/support the industry of three wheel vehicles of all types. Visit the Three Wheel Association page on the Flymall for more info on the association.

We have some big news for the Three Wheel Association and the Flymall. We have agreed to purchase the well known website 3-Wheelers.com. It will be accessible from Flymall.org as well as from the Three Wheel Association website.

Want a reproduction vintage 3 wheeler.  Walker Aviation can scratch built from pictures or drawings.  Visit his page on the Flymall.  

Prototypes:

Nautical Notes: Meet Ellen Falterman. Checkout her Facebook Expeditions page here. Ellen is a 26 year old, pilot, flight instructor, and extreme adventurer. She is currently preparing for an adventure that is like no other. Ellen is planning to row around the world. This is a 40,000 plus mile trip. She expects the trip to take about 7 years (maybe longer). She will be using a custom built ocean rowboat built in the United Kingdom. Navigation will be via GPS and a sexton. She’ll be starting the trip sometime in 2022 from her home state of Texas. Her first stop will be Florida and then down go go through the Panama Canal. Ellen is pictured here with her boat the “Evelyn Mae”. The Evelyn Mae was built for Ellen by Rannoch Adventure.

Ellen’s longest distance in the open ocean will be when she crosses the Pacific. This will be about 8,000 miles and her estimate is that it will take her 8 to 12 months. So Ellen will be on her boat, for 8 to 12 months non-stop. She will not get off for breaks or rest periods. Her boat can hold about 12 months of supplies. The Pacific crossing will just be Ellen and her boat.

Ellen is taking the international trip of a lifetime. How would you like to go on an international trip in your backyard? ZAVIKON ISLAND is home to a bridge that, at only 32 feet in length, is considered the shortest international bridge in the world. It connects a Canadian island with an American island in the middle of the Saint Lawrence River. So every time you go to your backyard, you have taken an international journey. This property is a private residence, both islands are part of a family’s home.

Who doesn’t love traveling on a cruise ship? Here’s a canal in Greece that makes the journey just as exciting as the cruise; the Canal of Corinth, Greece. Breathtaking views going through the canal.

Want to experience what it was like to sail on a Baltimore Clipper ship like the ones built over 100 years ago? The tall ship Liberty Clipper offers windjammer sailing vacation cruises on such a sailing ship. The Liberty Clipper is a replica sailing ship whose design was inspired by the Baltimore Clipper style of vessels which were predominant along the East Coast in the early 19th century. So you can go back in time and experience what it was like to sail on a Baltimore Clipper ship from the 19th century.

What’s better than a sailboat or motorboat? An amphibious vehicle. Did you know that the first self propelled amphibious vehicle was tested on July 13 1805? The vehicle was developed/invented by Oliver Evans. Click here for a short story about his invention.

Oliver Evans’ vehicle was steam powered. Steam was the choice of power during the era.

Steam Power beginnings: In 1698 Thomas Savery patented a pump with hand-operated valves to raise water from mines by suction produced by condensing steam. In about 1712 another Englishman, Thomas Newcomen, developed a more efficient steam engine with a piston separating the condensing steam from the water

Riding The Rails: If you enjoy vintage trains, here’s a journey for you. The Potomac Eagle Scenic Railroad in West Virginia. The railroad uses vintage locomotives and passenger cars to give you an awesome experience through scenic West Virginia.

The Autumn Colors Express is another vintage passenger train in West Virginia. The 2022 Autumn Colors Express takes you on a day-long journey through the New River Gorge National Park, at the peak of the fall foliage season. The round trip from Huntington, WV to Hinton, WV lets you experience this beautiful area of West Virginia in a way few do. This special passenger train pulled by Amtrak is comprised entirely of privately-owned vintage rail cars from all over the nation, assembled exclusively for this event. This will be a great experience later this year.

Animals in the headlines: Our wolfdog, Jett is gearing up for some awesome journeys this winter once we have some snow on the ground.

We close this newsletter with these words: Think big thoughts, but relish small pleasures.

Debbie Grasso’s Love Affair With A White Corvette

Written on July 28, 2022 at 9:21 am, by hkraemer

My love for Corvettes started at the tender age of 4. I remember standing behind the driver’s seat as my dad was driving with my arm holding on to his neck pointing out the corvettes as they went by. “Look at that sporty car”’ I would squeal, “I want one of those”!

I quickly decided my car would be white on the outside and red inside. I wanted two doors and 4 wheels and windows, a steering wheel and radio.

Click on image for a larger view

I would repeat this to my dad constantly over the years, he would suggest other colors and I would say no.

When I was 21 I came home from work one day and my parents were in the living room waiting for me. They wanted to talk.

“We want you to buy a new car to establish credit”. I said, “Oh no”!! “Everyone at work is constantly complaining about car payments and house payments. I am not interested in that”!

My dad said, “Debbie, look me in the eye. It is time to buy a car”. He had to say this to me several times until I finally got in gear!!

“Oh, its time to buy my Corvette”! As I was jumping up and down!!

Dad was jumping up and down  to!

My Mom was not thinking Corvette, but she got out voted!

My dad spent several days calling all the Chevy dealers to make a deal. They were constantly calling him back, he loved making a deal.

We went and ordered it and were told it would be 16 weeks until it would arrive. WHAT?

I cried when we went to pick it up. I started crying as I was driving her home. I asked my dad to drive, he was so happy to take over, I thought I would never get the car back! He loved that car to!

Over the years I saw many body styles and headlight styles, hard and soft top, wheel styles and windows and paint colors.

I believe this car was made for me, the perfect shape and style, I wouldn’t change a thing and I haven’t.

So, the secret behind the White with the Red is, when mixed together they make Pink which has always been my favorite color.

Grace McDonald – BikeHedonia Interview

Written on July 24, 2022 at 10:13 am, by hkraemer

Many of us have dreamed of taking our motorcycle (or car, or plane) and simply leaving to explore the world. At the age of 28, Grace McDonald did just that. In February 2017 she resigned from her career as a corporate lawyer and set off from Sydney, Australia, with a motorcycle, a dream and very little else.

Tell us how did you get into motorcycling?

When I was a child when had small motorbikes to ride around my parents’ 200 acre property, but my family saw motorcycles more as a (hazardous) means of transport than a passion. At the age of 23 I got my road licence and commenced a beautiful obsession with speed, motorcycles and freedom.

What made you decide to ride around the world?

I spent ten years becoming a corporate lawyer in Sydney, and quickly discovered that this was not the way to a happy life. Eventually I reached the end of my tether and decided that I just wanted to ride away on my motorcycle and not come back. Six months later I’d made that a reality as I rode out of town on my KTM 690 Enduro with all my worldly possessions strapped to the back.

Did you have a schedule?

I had no schedule; but I thought that I would ride to Paris from Australia and that it would take me 18 months. I was completely wrong. Along the way, I fell in love with people and places; someone would invite me to take a side trip and I’d always say yes; someone would recommend meeting a person or seeing a place two or three thousand kilometres away, and I’d always go. If you plan your trip and keep on schedule, you will only discover the things you already imagined.

How long have you been on the road now? Do you get tired?

It’s been nearly five and half years on the road and yes, you do get tired sometimes. But that’s the beauty of not being on a schedule. You can stop and rest and take in your surroundings whenever you need. I spent so long in Indonesia and Thailand that I now speaks some Indonesian and some Thai. Of course that’s just a recipe for staying longer still – because once you speak the language, suddenly all of the nuances of a place become available to you.

What did you do during Covid?

I was in Thailand when the music stopped and the borders closed. About three years into my trip, I suddenly found myself unable to travel and unable to make my funds stretch any further. It was initially a low time for me, but then I discovered enduro. I’d never ridden much serious off road before – just dirt and gravel tracks – and suddenly I was immersed in the glorious jungle single track of Northern Thailand. I made friends, learnt new skills and started a new business – HiVolt Moto Tours.

So are you still riding around the world or have you found a home in Thailand?

Both. I’ve got a home base and a business near Chiang Mai, where I run enduro and road tours mostly during the months of November to February. But during the other months of the year? That’s for me to travel the world. I still have my KTM 690 Enduro and I’m waiting for Myanmar to reopen so I can head through India, Pakistan and Iran.

Have you had any difficulties on the way?

For sure. I’ve had mechanical problems, money problems, and the odd crazy-machete-wielding man problem. What I’ve learnt is that there’s always a solution. Sometimes you have to find new skills and courage within yourself, other times you are set to be humbled and amazed by the generosity of ordinary people. And still other times – you just have to find another machete.

What’s your advice to anyone wanting to travel around the world like this?

There are a thousand ways to make your journey – everyone travels differently. Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing, just start. Starting is the hardest part. You’ll figure out the rest.

Flymall.org June 2022 Wheels & Wings Newsletter

Written on July 2, 2022 at 8:54 am, by hkraemer

Happy 4th of July everyone!

Welcome to the Kraemer Aviation/Flymall.org Wheels & Wings Newsletter. This month “The Great Escape”. The theme is all about get away vehicles and/or vehicles used in great escapes.

You can view past newsletters here.


Interested in living at an airport?  Visit our Aviation Real Estate page here. You can view price data for airport property in our Market Watch section of the Flymall. Here is the data for all airport property. You can refine the search by “state” simply by searching for the desired state under “Model”. We have a nice airport and home for sale in Carroll County Maryland with a 1900 foot grass strip. Click here for details.

Want to have your business highlighted on the Flymall???  We offer inexpensive rates to have your business featured on our Wheels & Wings page.  Contact us for more info.

On June 26, Jett celebrated her 9th birthday. She was treated to some banana cream pie.

History Trivia: Have you heard of the Colditz Cock. The Colditz Cock was a glider built by British prisoners of war for an escape attempt from Oflag IV-C (Colditz Castle) in Germany.

After the execution of 50 prisoners who had taken part in the “Great Escape” from Luft Stalag III, the Allied High Command had discouraged escape attempts, though the plan to build a glider was encouraged in order to divert the energies of the prisoners from descending into boredom and tedium. The idea for the glider came from Lieutenant Tony Rolt. Rolt, who was not even an airman, had noticed the chapel roof line was completely obscured from German view. He realized that the roof would make a perfect launching point from which the glider could fly across the River Mulde, which was about 60 metres below.

Below is the only know photo of the “Cock” as it was called. This was taken on April 15 1945 by Lee Carson, one of two American newspaper correspondents assigned to the task force which captured the castle.

In the movie “The Great Escape”, Steve McQueen rode a 1962 650cc Triumph TR6R modified to look like a WWII-era side-valve BMW with an olive paint job. In the movie McQueen was a better driver than many of the stuntmen playing Germans, so McQueen put on an SS uniform for some of these scenes and chased himself. While McQueen is famous for The Great Escape’s most famous stunt (jumping the fence), it was Bud Ekins who performed it. When you watch the motorcycle chase scenes, you can clearly see the riding style is exactly the same. Click here to research Steve McQueen vehicle values from the Flymall Market Watch.

The Bonnie and Clyde get-away car of choice was a Ford. They didn’t buy them, they stole them! Did you know that the papers to incorporate Ford were signed on June 16 1903. Here’s the Bonnie and Clyde “death car” is on display under glass.

If you enjoy history we have a new aviation history fact each day at the bottom of our webpages.  Some days there may be more than one, just refresh the page.  And if you like Beatles history, checkout our Events Calendar and select the Beatles category.  This is a work in progress, we’re building the most comprehensive calendar of important dates in Beatle history.  For those that like to stick with current news, we have an aviation news ticker on our home page.  This is updated daily to show the current aviation news.

Achievements & Special Recognition: Earlier this month, Rowena passed her instrument checkride with Harry. She plans to purchase a single engine turboprop to be able to visit family in her home country of Jamaica. Congratulations!

Instructors, what to highlight your students first solo or other achievement here?  Just send us a short write-up and a picture or two and we’ll post it here for you.  Click here for our contact info.

Aviation/Aviators in the news: Larry Murphy was the Chinook helicopter pilot who’s iconic landing during Operation Mountain Resolve was captured on film. Operation Mountain Resolve was launched by a coalition led by the United States on 7 November 2003 in the Nuristan province and Kunar province in Afghanistan. It involved an airdrop into the Hindu Kush mountains by the U.S. 10th Mountain Division . Not many helicopter pilots could perform a maneuver like this.

The aviation section of the Flymall is full of aviation news, training info, and much more for the aviator.

Air show season is always just around the corner.  Want to travel to air shows in your own aircraft?  Visit our used aircraft page on the Flymall to view our inventory.

On June 11, the Flymall Team attended the AirPower Tour at the Hagerstown Aviation Museum. Click here for more pictures from the event. One of the highlights was getting to climb in the cockpit of Harry’s friend’s DC-3.

The DC-3 first flew in 1935. Over 16,000 were produced. There are still some in airline service to this day. The C-47 (Military version of the DC3) was one of the most vital pieces of equipment that helped win WWII. The aircraft is also acclaimed for its role in the Berlin Airlift.

Car/Motorcycle Show News: Earlier this month the Flymall Team attended the Original British Car Day in MT. Airy Maryland. They had the Lomax entered in the show and it earned a First Place Award in it’s class. Click here for more pictures from this great British Car Show. Click on the image below for a larger view.

The Laytonsville Cruise In is the place to be on a Friday night in Montgomery County.  The Laytonsville Cruise In was started by Harry in 2010. It has become one of the most popular cruise ins in the area. You can follow Harry on Facebook for daily updates during the many shows and events he attends.

New awards for Award Night

Harry’s friend Bingo has sponsored these very cool awards for July, August, September, and October. Checkout his cool shop on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/BingosSwapMeetGarage

June 18 2022, Harry, Pat, and Mel Short attended the District Harley Davidson Bikini Bike Wash & Cookout. It was a great day with good food, cool bikes, live music, and more. Click here for more pictures from the event. They had an axe throwing contest/event that day. Pat got 3 in a row. Click here for the YouTube video showing Pat’s performance.

June 10th was an awesome night at the Laytonsville Cruise In. We had a large variety of vehicles including; a military truck, a golf cart, a go cart, vintage cars, motorcycles, bicycles, race cars, modern performance cars, a firetruck, vintage ramp body truck, a dirt bike, and more. Click here for pictures from June 10th.

Click on the picture below for highlights from June 10th.

Laytonsville 06-10-2022 Highlights

On June 9, Harry attended the District Harley Davidson Bike Night. The weather was perfect. Mild temperatures and low humidity. Harry rode the 1974 Indian MX74 to the event. Click here for more pictures. Checkout their Facebook page for all of their events. Their Bike Night usually has a free live band.

Our Events Calendar has the most current info regarding local and national car shows, air shows, and more.  With nearly 30 categories, there is something for everyone.  The Day Tripper section of the Flymall has dozens of day trip ideals and interesting places to visit.  Check it out here.

Barn Finds/Hangar Finds:  In the 1967 film, The Dirty Dozen” there is a German half-track vehicle used in an escape scene. This vehicle was pulled from a barn located in the Salisbury Plain (south western part of central southern England) in the early 1960s. It was purchased by a farmer who bought it as workhorse. It stayed there in that person’s barn until another gentleman purchased it and restored it. The gentleman that restored it was also an extra in the 1967 film and in addition, he taught Lee Marvin on how to double clutch. An iconic escape scene from the film has Lee Marvin driving the vehicle over the Chateaux Bridge. If fact, resources say the the gentleman that restored it, was crouched under the dash telling Lee Marvin how to drive the vehicle during that scene while they were escaping over the Chateaux Bridge.

Need an appraisal on your barn find?  Visit our Appraisal Page for information on our appraisals. 

Visit our online store to search for hard to find car parts, aircraft parts, and much more.  You can pay online in our secure store, just click on the Store button on our home page.

Visit the Test Drive section of the Flymall for reviews on automobiles, aircraft, motorcycles, and more. Read about it before you buy it.  You can also research price info on a wide variety of vehicles, collectibles, and more in the Market Watch section of the Flymall. 

If you’re restoring a fabric aircraft, Ira Walker of Walker Aviation is your resource.  Visit his page on the Flymall by clicking here

CFI / DPE Notes:  On June 12 2019, Harry passed the final checkride to become a DPE and was issued his Certificate of Designation.

And on July 1 2019, Harry gave his first checkride. He is pictured here with the applicant after the checkride.

Rachel did her 1st solo earlier this month and then on June 30 2022, she passed her Private Pilot Checkride with Harry. Here are some pictures from her 1st solo.

The first solo is always a big accomplishment in the path to earning your private pilot certificate. Click here for a video on the water bucket tradition. Click here for Harry’s slides on the “Clipping of the Shirt Tail” tradition (shirttail).

Here’s Rachel on her checkride day after passing the test. She did a great job. Harry gave her numerous failures to deal with. She had an engine failure at 200 feet AGL on the soft field takeoff, a flap failure on the soft filed landing, and a landing with no airspeed indicator, all were handled perfectly. Rachel is an outstanding young woman with goals to be an airline pilot back in her home country of Israel or somewhere in Europe. In Israel she works as a medic and a firefighter. Click on the image below for a larger view.

Visit Harry’s Practical Test page for information on his checkrides.  You will also find useful information there to help you prepare for your checkride.  You can also visit Harry’s Lesson Plan section of the Flymall for other flight training information.  Visit our Flight Training page for information on our aviation training classes.

Always check NOTAMs, look especially for TFRs. This was for Santa Monica, California earlier this month. If you’re in this area, there is no escaping a TFR. Watch out.

Weather in the news: The weather was certainly in the news for the maiden voyage of the Titanic. The Titanic did not have enough life boats for all of the passengers to escape the icy waters of the North Atlantic.

Titanic had 20 lifeboats of three different types:

  • 14 clinker-built wooden lifeboats, measuring 30 feet (9.1 m) long by 9 feet 1 inch (2.77 m) wide by 4 feet (1.2 m) deep.
  • 2 wooden cutters intended to be used as emergency boats.
  • 4 “collapsible” Engelhardt lifeboats.

June 8th brought the mid-Atlantic region numerous lines of heavy thunderstorms. Here’s a few snapshots of the radar from that day.

Storms are something pilots need to avoid always. How far is far enough to avoid storms? Leave your thoughts in the comments section below.

Three Wheel Association (TWA):  Here is a cool 3 wheel bicycle that is used by police in areas with large public beaches. There is no escaping the police here with these very cool electric assist 3 wheel pedal bicycles.

Harry started the Three Wheel Association in 2013 to promote/support the industry of three wheel vehicles of all types. Visit the Three Wheel Association page on the Flymall for more info on the association.

Want a reproduction vintage 3 wheeler.  Walker Aviation can scratch built from pictures or drawings.  Visit his page on the Flymall.  

Prototypes: The ejection seat, an escape vehicle. In 1916, Everard Calthrop, an early inventor of parachutes, patented an ejector seat using compressed air. By World War II both Heinkel and SAAB had developed ejection seats.

The enclosed ejection seat concept has also been looked at and taken a step further by using the entire fuselage and the escape pod.

The Kamov Ka-50, which entered limited service with Russian forces in 1995, was the first production helicopter with an ejection seat. The system is similar to that of a conventional fixed-wing aircraft; however the main rotors are equipped with explosive bolts to jettison the blades moments before the seat is fired.

The only commercial jetliner ever fitted with ejection seats was the Soviet Tupolev Tu-144. However, the seats were present in the prototype only, and were only available for the crew and not the passengers. The Tu-144 that crashed at the Paris Air Show in 1973 was a production model, and did not have ejection seats.

The Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, (LLRV) and its successor Lunar Landing Training Vehicle (LLTV), used ejection seats. Neil Armstrong ejected on 6 May 1968.

The only spacecraft ever flown with installed ejection seats were VostokGemini, and the Space Shuttle.

Early flights of the Space Shuttle, which used Columbia, were with a crew of two, both provided with ejector seats (STS-1 to STS-4), but the seats were disabled and then removed as the crew size was increased.

Nautical Notes: Here’s an escape vehicle of a different nature. This is an offshore oil rig escape pod. Online, you can find numerous locations around the globe where these have been turned in to floating motel rooms that you can stay in. Originally designed to save lives, now used as floating motel rooms. How cool is that?

The Autocanoe by John Montgomery. a Pedal Powered Amphibious Recumbent Tricycle and a Road-able Pedal Canoe! The configuration is that of a Recumbent Tricycle with the two forward wheels driving and the single rear wheel steering both on land and in the water. It can travel over the road and through the water with comfort and grace. Not designed as an escape vehicle, however it could certainly be used as one. Just paddle the canoe of out the flooded area and then pedal on.

Riding The Rails: There are lots of stories regarding German prisoner’s being rescued during WWII via trains. One of them was the Kastner Train. The Kastner train consisted of 35 cattle wagons that left Budapest on 30 June 1944, during the German occupation of Hungary, carrying over 1,600 Jews to safety in Switzerland.

Here’s another story regarding a train leaving Nazi Germany, however this train took about 2,500 Jews to freedom. This story starts in early April 1945, just a few days before the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. The Nazis were in a hurry to get rid of the inmates. Three different trains left Bergen-Belsen between April 6 and April 11. Each train had about 2,500 prisoners. Their destination was the Theresienstadt concentration camp, in German occupied Czechoslovakia. Ultimately only one train reached the camp, after a few dozen of its passengers were killed in an aerial bombing by Allied forces. A second, later known as the “lost train,” traveled for two weeks back and forth between the lines of combatants, was caught in Russian-German crossfire, and finally came to a halt near the town of Troebitz, in eastern Germany, where the prisoners were liberated by the Red Army. the third train, which was actually the first of the three to leave Bergen-Belsen, is the train that carried the Jews to freedom. This train is pictured below. This train left Bergen-Belsen on April 7 1945. Many of the prisoners on this train were were “privileged” prisoners who had previously been in the “special camp” at Bergen-Belsen. They had been selected by the Germans for future prisoner exchanges with the Allies. One report says that the S.S. personnel escorting this train had orders to drown the prisoners if they came under Allied fire. After a six day journey, the train came to a stop with Allied and German fire in the not so far distance. The Germans fled the train under the cover of night via the trains locomotive, however they returned the next day. By April 13th, American soldiers had reached the train with no German resistance. And all on the train were eventually freed. Click here for the full story on this train and how this picture was discovered.

Von Ryan’s Express is a 1965 film (not based on a true story). While not a true story, the film is very interesting and exciting. The film depicts a group of Allied prisoners of war (POWs) who conduct a daring escape by hijacking the freight train carrying the POWs and fleeing through German-occupied Italy to Switzerland.

Animals in the headlines: Did you know that turtles are escape artist? They don’t need a vehicle to escape. In fact, turtles are good climbers. Checkout this picture of a snapping turtle climbing a fence.

There are times when animals need our help to escape, to escape extinction that is. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) has helped numerous species of animals escape extinction. AZA accredited zoos and aquariums have collaborated on breeding and reintroduction programs that have helped save at least nine species like California condors, black-footed ferrets, Przewalski’s horse, golden lion tamarins, American red wolves, and more from the brink of extinction. Great job.

We close this newsletter with these words: Compliment at least three people every day.

How I Became Interested In Aviation

Written on June 2, 2022 at 7:14 pm, by hkraemer

As a young child in the 1960s my dad would take me to small airports to watch the planes.  He loved aviation and boating.  My dad always wanted a son that was a captain on a boat or plane. On weekends I remember hanging out at the Glenn L Martin Airport (now called Martin State Airport), Frederick Municipal Airport, Essex Skypark, the Bay Bridge Airport, and many others.  During one of our visits to the Bay Bridge Airport in the late 1960s, I got my first plane ride.  I remember my dad paid a penny a pound for me to get my plane ride.  I was 9 or 10 at the time.

Here I am with my dad at the Frederick Municipal Airport in the 1960s. I am on the right side of the picture. Click on the image for a larger view.

Here I am on the day of my first plane ride at the Bay Bridge Airport sometime in the 1960s. I am in the blue shirt. Click on the image for a larger view.

When I was about 13 years old a close friend of our family was dating a girl (Doreen) that was in the Civil Air Patrol.  Doreen was about 16 or 17 at the time.  My dad was so impressed with her, for weeks after meeting her, Doreen was all he talked about.  Dad tried very hard to get me interested in joining the Civil Air Patrol after meeting Doreen.  For some unknown reason I had no interest in the Civil Air Patrol.  My dad did send me to sailing school where I learned to sail.  I went on to join the Sea Scouts and sailed on a 42 foot Ketch. After trying for a long time, dad gave up on the notion that I would join the Civil Air Patrol and become a pilot.

Fast forward a few years, I was about 15 years old, dad tried very hard to get me interested in taking flying lessons.  By now, I was hanging out with guys a little older than me that had their own cars and I thought that was the coolest thing.  My answer to flying lessons was “Dad, I will be driving soon and getting my own car”. 

My dad died when I was 23 years old.  A few months after he died, I was out riding around feeling lonely.  I remember being near Martin State Airport.  I said to myself “Let’s stop in and see what that flying thing was all about”.   I took a lesson that day and loved it.  Nearly 40 years later, I am still flying and it has been my livelihood for the better part of that 40 years.  I am now a Designated Pilot Examiner and issuing pilot certificates to the folks my dad and I would watch in the 1960s. 

ICAO Flight Plan

Written on June 2, 2022 at 6:46 pm, by hkraemer

5−1−9. International Flight Plan (FAA Form
7233−4)− IFR Flights (For Domestic or
International Flights)
a. General
Use of FAA Form 7233−4 is:
1. Mandatory for assignment of RNAV SIDs
and STARs or other PBN routing,
2. Mandatory for all IFR flights that will depart
U.S. domestic airspace, and
3. Recommended for domestic IFR flights.
NOTE−
1. An abbreviated description of FAA Form 7233−4
(International Flight Plan) may be found in this section. A
detailed description of FAA Form 7233−4 may be found on
the FAA website at:
http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/
headquarters_offices/ato/service_units/enroute/flight_pl
an_filing/
2. Filers utilizing FAA Form 7233−1 (Flight Plan) may not
be eligible for assignment of RNAV SIDs and STARs. Filers
desiring assignment of these procedures should file using
FAA Form 7233−4, as described in this section.

3. When filing an IFR flight plan using FAA Form 7233−4,
it is recommended that filers include all operable
navigation, communication, and surveillance equipment
capabilities by adding appropriate equipment qualifiers as
shown in Tables 5−1−3 and 5−1−4. These equipment
qualifiers should be filed in Item 10 of FAA Form 7233−4.
4. ATC issues clearances based on aircraft capabilities
filed in Items 10 and 18 of FAA Form 7233−4. Operators
should file all capabilities for which the aircraft and crew
is certified, capable, and authorized. PBN/ capability
should be filed as per paragraph 5-1-9 b 8 Items 18 (c) and
(d).
b. Explanation of Items Filed in FAA Form
7233−4
Procedures and other information provided in this
section are designed to assist operators using FAA
Form 7233−4 to file IFR flight plans for flights that
will be conducted entirely within U.S. domestic
airspace. Requirements and procedures for operating outside U.S. domestic airspace may vary significantly from country to country. It is, therefore,
recommended that operators planning flights outside U.S. domestic airspace become familiar with
applicable international documents, including
Aeronautical Information Publications (AIP); International Flight Information Manuals (IFIM); and
ICAO Document 4444, Procedures for Air Navigation Services/Air Traffic Management, Appendix 2.
NOTE−
FAA Form 7233−4 is shown in FIG 5−1−3. The filer is
normally responsible for providing the information
required in Items 3 through 19.
1. Item 7. Aircraft Identification. Insert the
full registration number of the aircraft, or the
approved FAA/ICAO company or organizational
designator, followed by the flight number.
EXAMPLE−
N235RA, AAL3342, BONGO33
NOTE−
Callsigns filed in this item must begin with a letter followed
by 1−6 additional alphanumeric characters.

2. Item 8. Flight Rules and Type of Flight.
(a) Flight Rules. Insert the character “I” to
indicate IFR
(b) Type of Flight. Insert one of the
following letters to denote the type of flight:
(1) S if scheduled air service
(2) N if non−scheduled air transport
operation
(3) G if general aviation
(4) M if military
(5) X if other than any of the defined
categories above.
NOTE−
Type of flight is optional for flights that will be conducted
entirely within U.S. domestic airspace.

3. Item 9. Number, Type of Aircraft, and
Wake Turbulence Category.
(a) Number. Insert the number of aircraft, if
more than 1 (maximum 99).
(b) Type of Aircraft.
(1) Insert the appropriate designator as
specified in ICAO Doc 8643, Aircraft Type
Designators;
(2) Or, if no such designator has been
assigned, or in the case of formation flights consisting
of more than one type;
(3) Insert ZZZZ, and specify in Item 18, the
(numbers and) type(s) of aircraft preceded by TYP/.

(c) Wake Turbulence Category. Insert an
oblique stroke followed by one of the following
letters to indicate the wake turbulence category of
the aircraft:
(1) H — HEAVY, to indicate an aircraft
type with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of
300,000 pounds (136 000 kg), or more;
(2) M — MEDIUM, to indicate an aircraft
type with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of
less than 300,000 pounds (136,000 kg), but more than
15,500 pounds (7,000 kg);
(3) L — LIGHT, to indicate an aircraft type
with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of
15,500 pounds (7,000 kg) or less.
4. Item 10. Equipment

5. Item 13. Departure Aerodrome/Time
(a) Insert the ICAO four−letter location
indicator of the departure aerodrome, or
NOTE−
ICAO location indicators must consist of 4 letters. Airport
identifiers such as 5IA7, 39LL and Z40 are not in ICAO
standard format.
(b) If no four−letter location indicator has
been assigned to the departure aerodrome, insert
ZZZZ and specify the non−ICAO location identifier,
or fix/radial/distance from a nearby navaid, followed
by the name of the aerodrome, in Item 18, following
characters DEP/,
(c) Then, without a space, insert the estimated
off−block time.
EXAMPLE−
1. KSMF2215
2. ZZZZ0330

6. Item 15. Cruise Speed, Level and Route
(a) Cruise Speed (maximum 5 characters).
Insert the true airspeed for the first or the whole
cruising portion of the flight, in terms of knots,
expressed as N followed by 4 digits (e.g. N0485), or
Mach number to the nearest hundredth of unit Mach,
expressed as M followed by 3 digits (for example,
M082).
(b) Cruising level (maximum 5 characters).
Insert the planned cruising level for the first or the
whole portion of the route to be flown, in terms of
flight level, expressed as F followed by 3 figures (for
example, F180; F330), or altitude in hundreds of feet,
expressed as A followed by 3 figures (for example,
A040; A170).
(c) Route. Insert the requested route of flight
in accordance with guidance below.
NOTE−
Speed and/or altitude changes en route will be accepted by
FAA computer systems, but will not be processed or
forwarded to controllers. Pilots are expected to maintain
the last assigned altitude and request revised altitude
clearances directly from ATC.
(d) Insert the desired route of flight using a
combination of published routes and/or fixes in the
following formats:

should be separated by the characters “DCT”,
meaning direct.
EXAMPLE−
FLACK DCT IRW DCT IRW125023
NOTE−
IRW125023 identifies the fix located on the Will Rogers
VORTAC 125 radial at 23 DME.
(2) Combinations of published routes, and
fixes, navaids or waypoints should be separated by a
single space.
EXAMPLE−
WORTH5 MQP V66 ABI V385
(3) Although it is recommended that filed
airway junctions be identified using a named junction
fix when possible, there may be cases where it is
necessary to file junctioning airways without a named
fix. In these cases, separate consecutive airways with
a space.
EXAMPLE−
V325 V49
NOTE−
This method of filing an airway junction may result in a
processing ambiguity. This might cause the flight plan to be
rejected in some cases.

7. Item 16. Destination Aerodrome, Total
EET, Alternate and 2nd Alternate Aerodrome
(a) Destination Aerodrome and Total Estimated Elapsed Time (EET).
(1) Insert the ICAO four−letter location
identifier for the destination aerodrome; or, if no
ICAO location identifier has been assigned,
(Location identifiers, such as WY66, A08, and 5B1,
are not an ICAO standard format),
(2) Insert ZZZZ and specify the non−ICAO
location identifier, or fix/radial/distance from a
nearby navaid, followed the name of the aerodrome,
in Item 18, following characters DEST/,
(3) Then, without a space, insert the total
estimated time en route to the destination.
EXAMPLE−
1. KOKC0200
2. ZZZZ0330
(b) Alternate and 2nd Alternate Aerodrome
(Optional).
(1) Following the intended destination,
insert the ICAO four−letter location identifier(s) of alternate aerodromes; or, if no location identifier(s)
have been assigned;
(2) Insert ZZZZ and specify the name of the
aerodrome in Item 18, following the characters
ALTN/.
EXAMPLE−
1. KDFW0234 KPWA
2. KBOS0304 ZZZZ
NOTE−
Although alternate airport information filed in an FPL will
be accepted by air traffic computer systems, it will not be
presented to controllers. If diversion to an alternate airport
becomes necessary, pilots are expected to notify ATC and
request an amended clearance.

8. Item 18. Other Information
(a) Insert 0 (zero) if no other information; or,
any other necessary information in the sequence
shown below, in the form of the appropriate indicator
followed by an oblique stroke and the information to
be recorded:
NOTE−
1. Operators are warned that the use of indicators not
included in the provisions may result in data being rejected,
processed incorrectly, or lost.
2. Hyphens “-” or oblique strokes “/” should only be used
as described.
3. Avoid use of any other special characters in Field 18
information- use only letters and numbers.
4. An indicator without any associated information will
result in flight plan rejection.
(b) STS/ Reason for special handling by ATS
as follows:
(1) ALTRV: For a flight operated in
accordance with an altitude reservation.
(2) ATFMX: For a flight approved for
exemption from ATFM measures by the appropriate
ATS authority.
(3) FFR: Fire-fighting.
(4) FLTCK: Flight check for calibration of
navaids.

(5) HAZMAT: For a flight carrying hazardous material.
(6) HEAD: A flight with Head of State
status.

(7) HOSP: For a medical flight declared by
medical authorities.

(8) HUM: For a flight operating on a
humanitarian mission.
(9) MARSA: For a flight for which a
military entity assumes responsibility for separation
of military aircraft.
(10) MEDEVAC: For a life critical medical
emergency evacuation.
(11) NONRVSM: For a non-RVSM
capable flight intending to operate in RVSM airspace.
(12) SAR: For a flight engaged in a search
and rescue mission.
(13) STATE: For a flight engaged in
military, customs, or police services.
NOTE−
Other reasons for special handling by ATS are denoted
under the designator RMK/.
(c) PBN/ Indication of RNAV and/or RNP
capabilities. Include as many of the descriptors below
as apply to the flight, up to a maximum of 8 entries;
that is a total of not more than 16 characters.

NOTE−
Combinations of alphanumeric characters not indicated
above are reserved.
(d) NAV/ Significant data related to navigation equipment, other than as specified in PBN/.
(1) When Performance Based Navigation
Capability has been filed in PBN/, if PBN routing is
desired for only some segment(s) of the flight then
that information can be conveyed by inserting the
character “Z” in Item 10 and “NAV/RNV” in field 18
followed by the appropriate RNAV accuracy value(s)
per the following:
[a] To be assigned an RNAV 1 SID,
insert the characters “D1”.
[b] To be assigned an RNAV 1 STAR,
insert the characters “A1”.
[c] To be assigned en route extensions
and/or RNAV PTP, insert the characters “E2”.
[d] To prevent assignment of an RNAV
route or procedure, insert a numeric value of “0” for
the segment of the flight. Alternatively, you may
simply remove the segment of the flight indicator and
numeric value from the character string.
EXAMPLE−
1. NAV/RNVD1 or NAV/RNVD1E0A0 (Same meaning)
2. NAV/RNVA1 or NAV/RNVD0E0A1 (Same meaning)
3. NAV/RNVE2 or NAV/RNVD0E2A0 (Same meaning)
4. NAV/RNVD1A1 or NAV/RNVD1E0A1 (Same meaning)

5. NAV/RNVD1E2A1
NOTE−
1. Route assignments are predicated on NAV/ data over
PBN/ data in ERAS.
2. Aircraft certification requirements for RNAV operations within U.S. airspace are defined in AC 90-45A,
Approval of Area Navigation Systems for Use in the U.S.
National Airspace System, and AC 90−100A, U.S.
Terminal and En Route Area Navigation (RNAV)
Operations, as amended.
(2) Operators should file their maximum
capabilities in order to qualify for the most advanced
procedures.
(e) COM/ Indicate communications capabilities not specified in Item 10a, when requested by an
air navigation service provider.
(f) DAT/ Indicate data applications or capabilities not specified in Item 10a, when requested by an
Air Navigation Service Provider.

Kraemer Aviation / Flymall.org May 2022 Wheels & Wings Newsletter

Written on May 31, 2022 at 5:58 pm, by hkraemer

Welcome to the Kraemer Aviation/Flymall.org Wheels & Wings Newsletter

Earlier this month, Kraemer Aviation hosted it’s annual Memorial Day cookout and car show. Click here for more pictures and videos from the event.

We had a very nice Ferguson tractor show up at the Memorial Day car show and Harry’s friend Bill Gibson drove his Batmobile which was a big hit. Click on the images below for a larger view. Click here for a YouTube video of Bill Gibson demonstrating the flames and the rocket launcher.

This month the theme is all about planes, cars, boats, trains, etc. made in or from France.

You can view past newsletters here. Please share this newsletter with your friends.

Interested in living at an airport?  Visit our Aviation Real Estate page here. You can view price data for airport property in our Market Watch section of the Flymall. Here is the data for all airport property. You can refine the search by “state” simply by searching for the desired state under “Model”. We have a very nice grass strip for sale in Carroll County Maryland. Click here for details.

Want to have your business highlighted on the Flymall???  We offer inexpensive rates to have your business featured on our Wheels & Wings page.  Contact us for more info.

History Trivia: Where did the term “Socked In” come from. It is often used to describe weather not suitable for VFR flying. History books point to the French for this term. In the early days of flying, the French would bring the wind sock in when it was raining or too windy for flying. This was so that the wind sock did not get damaged. Click here for an article Harry wrote about this and other aviation terms.

Aileron is another “French” term, meaning little wing or fin.

If you enjoy history we have a new aviation history fact each day at the bottom of our webpages.  Some days there may be more than one, just refresh the page.  And if you like Beatles history, checkout our Events Calendar and select the Beatles category.  This is a work in progress, we’re building the most comprehensive calendar of important dates in Beatle history.  For those that like to stick with current news, we have an aviation news ticker on our home page.  This is updated daily to show the current aviation news.

Did you know that the high-wheel bicycle was invented in France? Eugène Meyer, a Frenchman, invented the high-wheeler bicycle design in 1869 and fashioned the wire-spoke tension wheel. We have one high-wheeler in our collection, a Facile.

Achievements & Special Recognition: It is very cool to customize your ride, make it your own design. That is exactly what  French designer Guillaume Radomski did when he set out to build a custom Harley Davidson Sportster. He started with a 1998 Harley-Davidson XLH1200 Sportster and this was his finished product. Click on the image for a larger view. We think he deserves some special recognition for his work.

Instructors, what to highlight your students first solo or other achievement here?  Just send us a short write-up and a picture or two and we’ll post it here for you.  Click here for our contact info.

Aviation/Aviators in the news: The aviation section of the Flymall is full of aviation news, training info, and much more for the aviator.

While on the topic of aviators and keeping with our French theme this month, it is important to mention Octave Chanute. Octave helped a lot of early aviation pioneers including the Wright Brothers. In May 1899 Wilbur wrote a letter to the Smithsonian Institution requesting information and publications about aeronautics. Some of the information he received was the work of Octave Chanut. The Wright Brothers began their experimentation in aviation that year.

Did you know that Bugatti made an aircraft? It was the Bugatti Model 100. It is pictured here with a 1936 Bugatti type 57 sc atlalante 

Here’s a helicopter with an unusual tail rotor design. It was designed and built by French aircraft designer Jean Cantinieau. The Faon helicopter. Originally this machine was called the Bamby, the name was changed to avoid issues with Disney. It sort of looks like a cross between an early Bell helicopter and a Robinson.

Air show season is always just around the corner.  Want to travel to air shows in your own aircraft?  Visit our used aircraft page on the Flymall to view our inventory. This month we have an aircraft for sale that was made in France. Click here for information on this very nice Turbocharged Trinidad that we have for sale.

Car/Motorcycle Show News:   The Laytonsville Cruise In is the place to be on a Friday night in Montgomery County.  The Laytonsville Cruise In was started by Harry in 2010. It has become one of the most popular cruise ins in the area. You can follow Harry on Facebook for daily updates during the many shows and events he attends.

May 20th was the official opening night for the Laytonsville Cruise In. This was also free ice cream for the drivers sponsored by Kraemer Aviation. Harry & Pat’s good friend Mel was on hand and brought a very rare side-by-side two wheel bicycle.

The Flymall team attended Classic Motorcycle Day 2022. This is an annual event that we have been attending for over 10 years. Harry’s 1912 AC Delivery Trike won Best-of-Show out of about 250 motorcycles. Click on the image below for a larger view. Click here for more pictures of the event.

There were two very cool sidecar rigs with machine guns at Classic Motorcycle Day this year. The machine gun itself has a few “French connections”. Listed below are just a few of the connections with the French and the development of the modern machine gun.

1708 – A French officer invented a light cannon that could fire 30 shots in two and a half minutes.

1711 – a French lawyer presented to the parliament of Dijon a ‘war machine’ made up of 10 carbine barrels capable of firing continuously.

1740 – A cannon able to shoot 11 times per minute was developed by a Frenchman called Chevalier de Benac.

1775 – a breech-loading volley gun, similar to the later mitrailleuse, was invented by a Frenchman called Du Perron which was worked by 3 or 4 men and capable of discharging 24 barrels 10 times a minute for a total rate of fire of 240 shots per minute.

 1790 – A former officer in the French military known as Joseph-François-Louis Grobert invented a ‘ballistic machine’ or ‘pyroballistic machine’ with multiple barrels operated by 4 men and a continuous rotational movement capable of firing 360 rifle shots a minute in a variety of calibers.

1792 – a French artist known as Renard invented a piece of ordnance that could be operated by one man and fired 90 shots a minute. Also in 1792 a French mechanic called Garnier invented a musket battery made up of 15 barrels capable of firing 300 shots in 2 minutes for a total rate of fire of 150 shots a minute or 10 shots per minute per barrel and of being operated by one man.

1831 – A French mechanic from the Vosges department invented a lever-operated cannon that could fire 100 shots a minute.

1832 – A machine capable of firing 500 rifle shots a minute was devised by Hamel, a French mechanic.

1856 – Frenchman Francois Julien patented a cannon that fed from a type of open-ended tubular magazine, only using rollers and an endless chain in place of springs.

Earlier this month, the Flymall team also attended the East Coast Military Expo at the Hagerstown Aviation Museum. Great show in an awesome setting. Click here for more pictures from the event.

We also attended District Harley Davidson’s annual Memorial Day cookout and bikini bike wash. Beer, bikes, and bikinis – what’s not to like. Click here for more picture of this awesome event.

While it is rare to see a Citroen at a car show in the US, here is a Citroen that is extremely rare. A 1938 Citroën 11B Traction Avant Coupé, one of four built.

Here’s another Citroen, this one is a one-of-a-kind. Used by the BBC for the 1990 London Marathon.

Our Events Calendar has the most current info regarding local and national car shows, air shows, and more.  With nearly 30 categories, there is something for everyone.  The Day Tripper section of the Flymall has dozens of day trip ideals and interesting places to visit.  Check it out here.

Barn Finds/Hangar Finds:  Need an appraisal on your barn find?  Visit our Appraisal Page for information on our appraisals. 

Diana Dors’ 1949 Delahaye 175 S Roadster is an awesome French designed car that sold for 3.3 millions US Dollars in 2010. It’s surely not sitting in a barn somewhere forgotten. Hopefully she is on display for everyone to see and enjoy.

Most folks think of barn finds as something in the United States. Not true! Here is a story from 2019 about a barn find in France that included over 80 vehicles.

Visit our online store to search for hard to find car parts, aircraft parts, and much more.  You can pay online in our secure store, just click on the Store button on our home page.

Visit the Test Drive section of the Flymall for reviews on automobiles, aircraft, motorcycles, and more. Read about it before you buy it.  You can also research price info on a wide variety of vehicles, collectibles, and more in the Market Watch section of the Flymall. 

If you’re restoring a fabric aircraft, Ira Walker of Walker Aviation is your resource.  Visit his page on the Flymall by clicking here

CFI / DPE Notes:  Visit Harry’s Practical Test page for information on his checkrides.  You will also find useful information there to help you prepare for your checkride.  You can also visit Harry’s Lesson Plan section of the Flymall for other flight training information.  Visit our Flight Training page for information on our aviation training classes.

Weather in the news: The end of May 2022 brought us numerous days with line after line of thunderstorms moving through. The weather did clear up perfectly for the long Memorial Day weekend.

Three Wheel Association (TWA):  Harry started the Three Wheel Association in 2013 to promote/support the industry of three wheel vehicles of all types. Visit the Three Wheel Association page on the Flymall for more info on the association.

Keeping with the French theme this month, here is our 1975 Lomax 223 Roadster. She’s a British car with a French (Citroen) powerplant and drive train. We get our parts from a Japanese guy that owns a French Car parts business based in the United States.

Morgan, Darmont, Sandford??? What is the connection? Another British 3 wheeler with a French connection.

About the time of WWI, a French gentleman named Robert Darmont started his business as a importer of the Morgan 3 wheeler from England. After the war he obtained a license from Morgan to build the Morgan 3 wheeler in France. The Darmont-Morgan was born. The Morgan and Darmont-Morgan are basically identical, although one was built in France. Stewart Sandford, another French gentleman was selling the Morgan 3 wheeler in France. Stewart saw the need for a faster, more powerful 3 wheeler so he designed the Sandford 3 wheeler. It had a 4 cylinder Ruby engine in it. Very different from the Morgan. The Sandford is all steel with the engine fully enclosed. The Morgan F series 3 wheeler also had an enclosed engine.

Pictured here from Harry’s collection, is an original trading card showing the Sandford and two Sandford models. Notice the incorrect spelling of Sandford on the models. It is incorrectly spelled Sanford.

Want a reproduction vintage 3 wheeler.  Walker Aviation can scratch built from pictures or drawings.  Visit his page on the Flymall.  

Prototypes: Here’s an awesome little motorcycle that the French company Peugeot unveiled at the Paris Auto Show in 2018. Called the PX2. We couldn’t find any information regarding whether this will make it into production.

Between May 20-21 1927, Charles Lindbergh made the first solo Atlantic crossing in an airplane. He did this flight in the Spirit of St. Louis, a custom built (prototype) aircraft. This flight brought instant fame to Charles Lindbergh. The original Spirit of St. Louis in preserved and on display at the National Air and Space Museum.

Here’s our 1928 Shelby Indy Edition bicycle with sidecar. This bicycle was made to commemorate Lindbergh’s Atlantic crossing.

Nautical Notes: The French frigate Hermione, was a 32-gun Concorde-class frigate of the French Navy. A replica of this ship was built and launched in 2012. The original was lost in 1793. Pictured here is the replica.

Riding The Rails: Here’s a cool French train that started operations in the late 1960s. The Le Lyonnais, or the Lyonnais, was an express train that linked Paris and Lyon in France. Introduced in 1968, it was operated by the Société Nationale des Chemins de fer français (SNCF). The train is named after the geographical area known as the Lyonnais, a historical (former) French province, whose name came from the city of Lyon. Pictured here is one of their “preserved” locomotives.

Keeping with our French theme for this month, Octave Chanute (born in Paris France) began his training as a civil engineer in 1848. He was widely considered brilliant and innovative in the engineering profession. During his career he designed and constructed the United States’ two biggest stockyards, Chicago Stock Yards (1865) and Kansas City Stockyards (1871). He designed and built the Hannibal Bridge with Joseph Tomlinson and George S. Morison, which was the first bridge to cross the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1869 and established Kansas City as the dominant city in the region. He designed many other bridges during his railroad career, including the Illinois River rail bridge at Chillicothe, Illinois, the Genesee River Gorge rail bridge near Portageville, New York, the Sibley Railroad Bridge across the Missouri River at Sibley, and more.

Animals in the headlines: The Bloodhound is a dog known for it’s ability to track human scent, even days later. It origins are traced back to France thousands of years ago.

We close this newsletter with these words: Here’s a well know French quote for closing our French themed newsletter – There is only one happiness in life, to love and be loved.

Flymall / Kraemer Aviation April 2022 Wheels & Wings Newsletter

Written on April 29, 2022 at 7:44 am, by hkraemer

Welcome to the Kraemer Aviation/Flymall.org Wheels & Wings Newsletter. The theme this month is “Famous people and their cars/planes/boats/trains, etc. & Famous Cars and Cars Seen On TV”.

This month; the story of Hachiko, new awards for the Laytonsville Cruise In, the first Boeing 720 built, Paul McCartney’s Aston Martin, a plane owned by Elvis, and more.

You can view past newsletters here.

Save the date. May 20 2022 is the “Official Opening Night” for the Laytonsville Cruise In. We will also have free ice cream for the drivers and one guest. Check out the new awards for this year.


Earlier this month, Kraemer Aviation hosted their annual Easter dinner. Click here for pictures from the event.

Interested in living at an airport?  Visit our Aviation Real Estate page here. You can view price data for airport property in our Market Watch section of the Flymall. Here is the data for all airport property. You can refine the search by “state” simply by searching for the desired state under “Model”.

Since this month’s theme is famous people and their vehicles, most likely one of the most famous aviation homes is John Travolta’s home and his planes. We have a few airport homes for sale in the Real Estate section of the Flymall.

We have a very nice grass strip available for sale. Keymar Airport in Carroll County Maryland. Click here for details.

Want to have your business highlighted on the Flymall???  We offer inexpensive rates to have your business featured on our Wheels & Wings page.  Contact us for more info.

History Trivia: Did you know that the first rock star to have his/her own private jet was James Brown. It was a Lear 23.

One of the most famous jets used by rock stars and rock groups was the Starship. The Starship was the very first Boeing 720 built. Groups that used this plane include Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Elton John, Allman Brothers Band, and many more.

If you enjoy history we have a new aviation history fact each day at the bottom of our webpages.  Some days there may be more than one, just refresh the page.  And if you like Beatles history, checkout our Events Calendar and select the Beatles category.  This is a work in progress, we’re building the most comprehensive calendar of important dates in Beatle history.  For those that like to stick with current news, we have an aviation news ticker on our home page.  This is updated daily to show the current aviation news.

Achievements & Special Recognition: Instructors, what to highlight your students first solo or other achievement here?  Just send us a short write-up and a picture or two and we’ll post it here for you.  Click here for our contact info.

Our friend Bill Gibson deserves some special recognition for his work on his own Bat Cave complete with a real Batmobile and Batcycle with Robin’s sidecar. Harry & Pat were lucky enough to get a personal tour recently. Click here for our post from the visit to the Bat Cave.

Aviation/Aviators in the news: Rock stars and private jets seem to go together. While the rock star’s whereabouts are usually known, sometimes their jets get lost. Elvis Presley’s 1962 Lockheed Jetstar sat abandoned for about 35 years until it was sold at auction in 2017 for just over $500,000 USD. It was in sad shape. You can view price data for Elvis Presley vehicles in our Market Watch section of the Flymall by clicking here.

The aviation section of the Flymall is full of aviation news, training info, and much more for the aviator.

The Kraemer Aviation team attended the Hagerstown Aviation Museum April Open House. Perfect weather and a great time. Click here for more pictures from the event.

Air show season is always just around the corner.  Want to travel to air shows in your own aircraft?  Visit our used aircraft page on the Flymall to view our inventory.

Car/Motorcycle Show News:   The Laytonsville Cruise In is the place to be on a Friday night in Montgomery County.  The Laytonsville Cruise In was started by Harry in 2010. It has become one of the most popular cruise ins in the area. You can follow Harry on Facebook for daily updates during the many shows and events he attends. Here’s info on the Cars & Cones event at the Laytonsville Cruise In.

Earlier this month, the Kraemer Aviation team attended the season’s first Bike Night at Elder Pine Brewing & Blending Co. Click here for some pictures from the event.

Who remembers The Bionic Woman? The series starred Lindsay Wagner. Here she is holding up a Mini Cooper with one hand.

District Harley Davidson held an open house “Blessing of the Bikes & Fish Fry” earlier this month. We were on hand to enjoy the bikes, food, and music. Click here for more pictures from the event.

Our Events Calendar has the most current info regarding local and national car shows, air shows, and more.  With nearly 30 categories, there is something for everyone.  The Day Tripper section of the Flymall has dozens of day trip ideals and interesting places to visit.  Check it out here.

We attended the annual Howard County Motorcycle Show & Swap meet earlier this month. This is a great place to find some good deals on used parts and motorcycles. Click here for more pictures from the event.

Here is a yearly event that is worth attending. A Gas & Steam Engine show at the Agricultural History Farm Park. The show is usually near the end of April or beginning of May. Lots of vintage tractors, farm animals, crafts, classic cars, good food, and more. Click here for some pictures from this year’s event.

If you grew up in the 60s, you will certainly remember The Munsters. You can view price data for some of the Munsters vehicles in our Market Watch section of the Flymall. Pictured here is their daily driver and grandpa in the Coffin Dragster.

Barn Finds/Hangar Finds:  Need an appraisal on your barn find?  Visit our Appraisal Page for information on our appraisals. 

Someone is just waiting and hoping to find this one in a barn somewhere. Perhaps two of the coolest things from the 1960s, Paul McCartney and his 1966 Aston Martin. And to add, the association of the car with James Bond! You can view Paul McCartney items in our Market Watch section here.

Here’s another Paul McCartney vehicle. Paul on his Honda motorcycle.

Visit our online store to search for hard to find car parts, aircraft parts, and much more.  You can pay online in our secure store, just click on the Store button on our home page.

Visit the Test Drive section of the Flymall for reviews on automobiles, aircraft, motorcycles, and more. Read about it before you buy it.  You can also research price info on a wide variety of vehicles, collectibles, and more in the Market Watch section of the Flymall. 

If you’re restoring a fabric aircraft, Ira Walker of Walker Aviation is your resource.  Visit his page on the Flymall by clicking here

CFI / DPE Notes:  Visit Harry’s Practical Test page for information on his checkrides.  You will also find useful information there to help you prepare for your checkride.  You can also visit Harry’s Lesson Plan section of the Flymall for other flight training information.  Visit our Flight Training page for information on our aviation training classes.

Earlier this month, Carmel passed her CFI (flight instructor) checkride with Harry. She is a very talented and natural pilot. This was their 4th checkride together.

Many of the local flying clubs at KGAI will often invite the DPEs to their club meetings and social events. This month, Harry, Pat, and Jett attended the Congressional Flying Club cookout at KGAI. It was a rainy evening, however everyone seemed to enjoy the company and grilled food. Click here for more pictures.

Weather in the news: While April is supposed to be the start of warmer weather, we had a few snow storms in April this year. Some were record breaking/setting.

April has certainly been a month to remember for severe weather. And this is how April 2022 ended. This was the Weather Channel’s forecast on Friday, April 29 2022. We had wind, hail, and tornado warnings!

Three Wheel Association (TWA):  Harry started the Three Wheel Association in 2013 to promote/support the industry of three wheel vehicles of all types. Visit the Three Wheel Association page on the Flymall for more info on the association.

One of our vintage 3 wheelers has met someone rich and famous. Our 1912 AC Delivery Trike and Wayne Carini of Chasing Classic Cars.

Want a reproduction vintage 3 wheeler.  Walker Aviation can scratch built from pictures or drawings.  Visit his page on the Flymall.  

Prototypes: Here’s a famous car from television in the mid 1980s. The Coyote X from the series Hardcastle & McCormick. The Coyote X was made using custom molds. It was based on the McLaren M6GT. The original one was made by Mike Fennel. It used a chassis from a Volkswagen Beetle and engine from a Porsche 914. For the second and third seasons, they used a different Coyote which was based on a De Lorean DMC-12. The judge drove a 1964 Corvette Sting Ray.

Nautical Notes: The rich and famous are no strangers to super yachts. Check out the Rising Sun motor yacht owned by David Geffen. She cost over $200 million to build. She’s 452 foot long and powered by 4 diesel engines producing over 48,000 horsepower. The yacht has 82 rooms and includes a gym, basketball court, wine cellar, and a movie theater. Sir Paul McCartney has been a guest on the Rising Sun.

Riding The Rails: Many celebrities have trains on their property or are model railroaders. Rod Stewart is one of them. Here is a little sample of his model railroad setup.

Animals in the headlines: Have you heard the story of Hachiko? He was a Japanese Akita dog, remembered for his remarkable loyalty to his owner, Hidesaburō Ueno, for whom he continued to wait for over nine years following Ueno’s death. Movies have been made about him. There are statues of him. There is an Akita Dog Museum In Japan that honors him. He has his own Wikipedia page. Click here for more information on this famous dog (man’s best friend).

We close this newsletter with these words: Don’t let anyone talk you out of pursuing what you know to be a great idea.

Commercial Pilot Questions / Scenarios

Written on April 8, 2022 at 12:30 pm, by hkraemer

1.On the descent, your captain drops below the glide slope. As FO. You bring it to his attention. He doesn’t respond to you or take corrective action. What should you do? >>>>>>>Call for a go-around (key the mike so it’s official with tower). If the CA still does not respond, take the controls.>>>>>>>>>Depends on how far out we are. IF outside the marker, probably nothing. Inside the marker, I’d insist on a missed approach if unstable and more than about a dot off. At 500 to mins if we are not stabilized and the Captain is unresponsive, I’m taking over and executing a missed approach.

2.You’re the FO. Your Captain shows up with what seems to be the smell of liquor on his breath. What would you do? Why? Other options?>>>>>>>>First, be very certain that it is liquor. Then tell the guy that he needs to call in sick immediately. I would tell him that he needs to first contact the union for substance-abuse intervention, then have the union contact me to confirm he did that. If he doesn’t comply, I call the CP.>>>>>>>>>>Bottom line is this. You need to be damn sure the guy has been drinking inside of the 8 hours or is impaired. Its possible the guy next to him spilled their beer on the Capt’s uniform shirt during the commute in. If I am really sure the guy has been drinking I’m going to encourage him to call in sick. If that fails, he has what is coming to him. I’d call my chief pilot and airport security as a last step.

3.A thunderstorm is moving in and approaching the end of the runway. Your captain is continuing on the approach to the same runway. What would say/do? Why?>>>>>>>>Point it out to the CA. If he takes no action, call approach and inquire about the storm cell. Request vectors if necessary.>>>>>>>>>How far is the T-storm? If close, I’d suggest we don’t land and wait for it to pass. Also, I’d have scoped out a reasonable alternate and suggest that. If we go missed into an T-storm we are done! Bottom line, I’m not going to let the Captain put me and the pax in a risky situation.

4.You’re at the hotel bar with your flight crew having drinks and its getting close to the 8 hour mark. Someone says lets have one more drink. What do you do?>>>>>>>>>Point out that time’s up, then go to my room. That way I dropped the hint, did not break the 8 hour rule, and did not witness anyone else breaking the rule. I don’t think I would play hall monitor. If they show up drunk in the AM, see #2.>>>>>>>>>. I’ve been here. I chose to leave prior to the 8 hour point and stopped drinking around 10 hours prior. Personally, I did not want to be witness to someone violating the 8 hours. When I left, everyone else left too…

5.How would you handle a situation where your captain didn’t seem to like you?>>>>>>>>Try to do your job and be polite. If the CA’s behavior is bad enough to affect your emotional state, you could either discuss it with him or ask company to pull you off the trip.>>>>>>>>I’ve seen this. Sometimes people don’t like you or you don’t like them. Who cares. I would run the checklists and required items, ensure safety of flight, and not let it bother me.

6.What would you do if your captain was performing nonstandard but not unsafe maneuvers?>>>>>>>Remind him of the SOP. If he continues to do it, maybe call union pro-standards…that will provide some intervention without getting him in trouble.>>>>>>If what the Captain is doing is not unsafe, I don’t feel it is necessary to correct them or inform them of company policy. My job isn’t check FO, it’s just FO. Anytime safety is compromised, I have a moral imperative to step in and stop the situation from escalating.

7.There are heavy thunderstorms ahead and your captain wants to fly through them. What should you say to the captain?>>>>>See #3>>>>>>>>>>>. This falls in a safety issue and I just tell the Capt. I’m not comfortable flying through T-storms. Perhaps give them a little lesson on WX radar.

8.You notice that your captain is not following the checklist. You bring it to his attention. He tells you he doesn’t need to follow it he knows it. What would you do? While in cruise, he starts reading a flight magazine. Should you say anything?>>>>>>>>If the CA refuses to use the checklist after being reminded, I would pull the checklist and run it myself to make sure it’s all done…out loud. If I think it’s a real issue, call pro-standards. If the CA takes a magazine out in cruise flight that means it’s time to read the paper, or whatever literature you brought.>>>>>>>>>Checklists are important. I would make sure the checklist is read by me. I occasionally see Capts who don’t do checklists or call for them online. Seriously, everyone reads magazines – I likely wouldn’t admit to reading in an interview, but I would not do anything about a captain who is reading. ALSO, this is a company issue , not an FAA issue. If your OPSPEC doesn’t prevent reading non-company material then it is okay.

9.Under what circumstances do you feel an FO would be justified in taking control of the aircraft (in flight) away from the captain?>>>>>>>>If the captain (a) is non-responsive or (b) flying the airplane into a dangerous situation, or (c) has lost attitude control and seems unable to correct it (stall, unusual attitude, etc). >>>>>>>>Impending doom.

10.The manifest shows you’re 55 pounds overweight. You inform your captain. He tells you it’s okay to fly. What should you do?>>>>>>Insist that the weight issue be corrected. If he refuses, threaten to walk off the job. He then has the choice of mellowing out, calling in sick, or explaining to the CP why his FO jumped ship. If he gives you a hard time about this, contact pro-standards.>>>>>Maybe there was a kid in the back that the FA miscounted as an adult? That should save some weight. If that fails, I’d Change the manifest to indicate less fuel and run the APU longer than required or take a 2 minute delay before takeoff to burn the 55LBS off so we are not overweight for takeoff.

11.If your captain showed up for your flight in a very bad mood, what would you do? Why?>>>>>>>>>>Suggest that maybe he should call in sick, express concern that he has a lot on his mind. If he is really out of control, threaten to walk off the job. He then has the choice of mellowing out, calling in sick, or explaining to the CP why his FO jumped ship.>>>>>>>>Who cares? Do the required checklists and flows, try to be friendly, and not worry about his problems.

Preflight Inspection

Written on April 7, 2022 at 6:59 pm, by hkraemer

Preflight Procedures / Preflight Inspection

Here are some “hot items” to be sure and check closely

Check the spinner for cracks

Check spinner alignment

Look at the two 2 circled areas. They are areas that can rub and wear a hole in the hose. The green is the spiral wrap. The wrap will wear before the hose or wire does.

Brake pad inspection

If you turn on the master switch and you DO NOT hear this noise, what instrument may have failed??????

Know and understand what safety wire is and why it is used

Here is what can happen if you extend flaps above Vfe

Today in Aviation History