Archive for December, 2016

Flymall / Kraemer Aviation December 2016 Newsletter

Friday, December 9th, 2016

Welcome to our December 2016 newsletter.

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Our own Pat Kraemer celebrated a birthday last month (Nov 7).  Happy birthday Pat. Here’s a picture of Pat at Julliano’s Brick Oven Pizza with one of her many birthday cakes she received.

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Flymall.org is a one stop shop for all things wheels and wings.

Here is a very short landing by a stol aircraft. There is 0 ground roll. Click here for the video.

Harry is working with one of his clients to donate their 1969 Hawker Siddeley HS.125 400 A (similar to the aircraft pictured here) to the Cambridge-Dorchester Regional Airport. It will be on permanent display as part of a new picnic area built just for the aircraft. It will be very cool to go there and see it knowing we had a part of it.

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We have some interesting news on the “wheels” side.  A 1938 Packard, immediately after winning its class at the Hilton Head Concours d’Elegance, rolled into a golf course pond and sank.  Several bystanders tried to stop the car when they noticed it rolling down the hill toward the pond, but the combination of dress shoes and 5,000+ lbs of concours-grade Packard proved too much, and the big, elegant, mist-gray car slid elegantly into the pond, submerging almost completely with quiet dignity. Scuba divers had to be sent in the pond to attach tow cables to the vehicle to pull it out of the pond.

Packard

More interesting automotive news… Here is a picture of the first car designed by Ferdinand Porsche. The Egger-Lohner vehicle (also referred to as the C.2 Phaeton).  First unveiled in Vienna, Austria, on 26 June 1898, Porsche had engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number one, signifying Ferdinand Porsche’s first design) onto all the key components.

first porsche

For more info on Ferdinand Porsche and this vehicle click here.

Here is something spotted on Facebook (posted here just for laughs):  How would I go about turning my 4 stroke 125 into a 2 stroke?  I heard 2 strokes are faster.  Does anyone know how to take strokes out of my engine? Is a stroke some sort of restrictor?

We  have a very nice EAA biplane for sale.  Click here for details on the biplane.  Our biplane would look good in your hangar next to your jet.

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With Christmas coming here are a few ‘Twas the night before Christmas” aviator’s style. Click here for a few variations on Twas the night before Christmas.

Last month we received some good news about one of the employees at the Washington International Flight Academy. Francesca was accepted to EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University.  Here she is pictured next to a DC3.  Francesca plans to join the Air Force and be a career military pilot.

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More good news about a WIFA employee – Ido (an instructor just since October 2015) has an amazing record with 25 signoffs (for checkrides) and all 25 have passed on the first test. Congratulations to Ido for 25 out of 25 in just over a year.

And yet another significant accomplishment by a WIFA employee: Ariel passed the FOI (Fundamentals of Instructing) knowledge test. Ariel is on her way to becoming a ground instructor at WIFA. She will also be working on her private pilot certificate soon.

Something interesting I found online regarding an SR71 pilot:

I’ll always remember a certain radio exchange that occurred one day as Walt (my back-seater) and I were screaming across Southern
California 13 miles high. We were monitoring various radio transmissions from other aircraft as we entered Los Angeles airspace.

Though they didn’t really control us, they did monitor our movement across their scope. I heard a Cessna ask for a readout of its ground
speed.

“90 knots” Center replied.

Moments later, a Twin Beech required the same.

“120 knots,” Center answered.

We weren’t the only ones proud of our ground speed that day…as almost instantly an F-18 smugly transmitted, “Ah, Center, Dusty 52
requests ground speed readout.”

There was a slight pause, then the response, “525 knots on the ground, Dusty.”

Another silent pause. As I was thinking to myself how ripe a situation this was, I heard a familiar click of a radio transmission coming from my back-seater. It was at that precise moment I realized Walt and I had become a real crew, for we were both thinking in unison.

“Center, Aspen 20, you got a ground speed readout for us?”

There was a longer than normal pause … “Aspen, I show 1,742 knots.”

“No further inquiries were heard on that frequency.”

Brian Shul, “Sled Driver”

 

On December 17 we will celebrate the anniversary of the Wright Brothers first powered flight.  Click here for more information on that historic flight.

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Today in Aviation History
September 21, 1947: An Air Force C-54 transport, The Big Push, equipped with robot flying equipment and an automatic pilot, flies from Clinton County AFB, Wilmington, OH to Brize Norton, England, and returns under automatic control - the first fully automatic transatlantic flight.