Archive for September, 2019

Flymall / Kraemer Aviation September 2019 Wheels & Wings Newsletter

Monday, September 30th, 2019

Welcome to our September Wheels & Wings newsletter.  Click here for our September 2019 NewsletterClick here to view past newsletters.

Earlier this month, Pat & Harry hosted their annual Labor Day cookout.  Click here for more pictures.

Harry celebrated another birthday this month.  Here’s a picture of the gathering at Julliano’s Brick Oven Pizza.

History Trivia:  This month we bring you the first trans-Canada automobile journey.  Click on the post below for more details.

More trivia for this month.  Did you know that from September 10 2019 to September 19 2019, each and every date reads the same backwards as it does forwards:  9-10-19, 9-11-19, 9-12-19, 9-13-19, 9-14-19, 9-15-19, 9-16-19, 9-17-19, 9-18-19, 9-19-19.

Achievements & Special Recognition:  Harry has been busy testing pilot applicants for various certificates and ratings.  You can follow Harry/Kraemer Aviation on Facebook to get daily updates on his checkride applicants.

Flight Instructors, want to highlight your student’s first solo or earning a new certificate or rating?  Just send us the info with a picture and we will post it here.

Aviation/Aviators in the news:  Each day on the Flymall we give you a “Today In Aviation” fact.  Its located at the bottom of our web-pages.  Some days there may be more than one.  Simply refresh the page to see if there is another fact.

Visit our Events Calendar for up-to-date airshow dates and other aviation related events.  You can even have our calendar send you an email reminder about an event that you’re interested in attending.

Car/Motorcycle Show News:  Last month we posted the sad news of the loss of Jessi Combs.  Here is a nice tribute video we found on Facebook.

September 11, 1970, the Ford Pinto was introduced to the American market. Ford executive Lee Iacocca wanted a new model that weighed less than 2,000 pounds, and that would be priced at less than $2,000 USD.

September is also the month that the Chevrolet Camaro was introduced.  Click here for a post that Harry did on the Camaro.

Pat, Jett, and Harry attended the annual Arcadia Steam Engine and Tractor  show.  Click here fore more pictures and video from the event.

Here’s Harry’s video from the show with all of his still photos and videos.

Barn Finds/Hangar Finds:  How many readers have an old crankshaft or two in the barn, just waiting to do something cool with it???  Just imagine having a few of these crankshafts in your barn.  This is the crankshaft for a Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C engine, the largest reciprocating engine in the world. The engine is used in large container ships. It’s a 1810-liter engine that generates 108,920 horsepower at 102 RPM, and it idles at 22 RPM… almost 3 seconds per rotation. This crankshaft weighs 300 tons (660,000 pounds) and each piston weighs 12,000 pounds and has a stroke length is 8.2 feet.

As of 2006 there were more than 300 of these engines in active service.

How about a 36,000 miles Oldsmobile Calais Indy 500 Pace Car for a barn find?  This is a one owner car.  Click here for more info.

Visit our Market Watch section of the Flymall for current and historical prices on collector cars & motorcycles, aircraft, and more.  Our Market Watch section also allows you to submit your own price data to be added to our free online database.

If you need an appraisal on your barn find or hangar find, visit our appraisal page for information on our appraisals.

Visit the “Test Drive” section of the Flymall for reviews on cars, motorcycles, aircraft, and more.  You can even share your experience there as well.

CFI / DPE Notes: As of this newsletter Harry has completed about 40 checkrides.  Its hard work, but very enjoyable to be the one whom issues new pilots their Private Pilot Certificate.  Visit Harry’s Practical Test page for information on his checkrides and to view his schedule.

Checkout Harry’s question and answer section of his Practical Test page.  This is one “easy to use” database that prepares you for the knowledge test as well as for the practical test.  The database replaces more than a dozen books all at your fingertips and smart phone friendly.

Weather in the news:  Do Hurricanes for at or near the equator?

No known hurricane has ever crossed the equator. Hurricanes require the Coriolis force to develop and generally form at least 5° away from the equator since the Coriolis force is zero there.   Tropical Storm Vamei was the closest ever that a tropical storm formed near the equator.

Three Wheel Association (TWA):  

1919: Kubota (the tractor company) forms a subsidiary to manufacture cars, named it 實用自動車 (Jitsuyo Automobiles) in Osaka. American William R. Gorham previously had approached Kubota with a design for a two passenger three-wheeled car powered by Harley-Davidson motorcycle engine. Here is a picture of that vehicle. This company would later become part of or merge with Datsun.

Jitsuyo’s first product is the small three-wheeled ‘Gorham’ car. Production of the Gorham 3-wheeler is about 30 units per month. About 150 Gorhams are sold.

Pat, Jett, and Harry attended the large Arcadia Show 2019.  Click on one of the pictures below to view a Facebook post highlighting the rare and unusual three wheelers spotted at the show.


Prototypes:  This month we have a 1970 Dodge Diamente Concept for you.

Animals in the headlines:  Click here for Jett’s page on the Flymall.  Jett attends many car/motorcycle shows with Pat & Harry.  Jett helps win votes for our vehicles at judged shows.  She also is on hand to assist in aircraft sales.

We close this newsletter with this:

Instrument Rating Part 141 Requirements

Wednesday, September 4th, 2019

Part 141 Appendix C

Each approved course must include at least the following ground training on the aeronautical knowledge areas listed in paragraph (b) of this section appropriate to the instrument rating for which the course applies:

(1) 30 hours of training if the course is for an initial instrument rating.

(2) 20 hours of training if the course is for an additional instrument rating.

(b) Ground training must include the following aeronautical knowledge areas:

(1) Applicable Federal Aviation Regulations for IFR flight operations;

(2) Appropriate information in the “Aeronautical Information Manual”;

(3) Air traffic control system and procedures for instrument flight operations;

(4) IFR navigation and approaches by use of navigation systems;

(5) Use of IFR en route and instrument approach procedure charts;

(6) Procurement and use of aviation weather reports and forecasts, and the elements of forecasting weather trends on the basis of that information and personal observation of weather conditions;

(7) Safe and efficient operation of aircraft under instrument flight rules and conditions;

(8) Recognition of critical weather situations and windshear avoidance;

(9) Aeronautical decision making and judgment; and

(10) Crew resource management, to include crew communication and coordination.

4. Flight training.

(a) Each approved course must include at least the following flight training on the approved areas of operation listed in paragraph (d) of this section, appropriate to the instrument-aircraft category and class rating for which the course applies:

(1) 35 hours of instrument training if the course is for an initial instrument rating.

(2) 15 hours of instrument training if the course is for an additional instrument rating.

(b) For the use of full flight simulators, flight training devices, or aviation training devices –

(1) The course may include training in a full flight simulator, flight training device, or aviation training device, provided it is representative of the aircraft for which the course is approved, meets the requirements of this paragraph, and the training is given by an authorized instructor.

(2) Credit for training in a full flight simulator that meets the requirements of § 141.41(a) cannot exceed 50 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the course or of this section, whichever is less.

(3) Credit for training in a flight training device that meets the requirements of § 141.41(a), an advanced aviation training device that meets the requirements of § 141.41(b), or a combination of these devices cannot exceed 40 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the course or of this section, whichever is less. Credit for training in a basic aviation training device that meets the requirements of § 141.41(b) cannot exceed 25 percent of the total training hour requirements permitted under this paragraph.

(4) Credit for training in full flight simulators, flight training devices, and aviation training devices if used in combination, cannot exceed 50 percent of the total flight training hour requirements of the course or of this section, whichever is less. However, credit for training in a flight training device or aviation training device cannot exceed the limitation provided for in paragraph (b)(3) of this section.

(c) Each approved course must include the following flight training –

(1)For an instrument airplane course: Instrument training time from a certificated flight instructor with an instrument rating on the approved areas of operation in paragraph (d) of this section including at least one cross-country flight that –

(i) Is in the category and class of airplane that the course is approved for, and is performed under IFR;

(ii) Is a distance of at least 250 nautical miles along airways or ATC-directed routing with one segment of the flight consisting of at least a straight-line distance of 100 nautical miles between airports;

(iii) Involves an instrument approach at each airport; and

(iv) Involves three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems.

Today in Aviation History
October 14, 1947: Capt. Charles E. Yeager, USAF, becomes the first person to pilot an a/c faster than the speed of sound, flying the Bell X-1 rocket powered research a/c from Muroc Air Force Base, CA.