Archive for December, 2014

Plane Crash – N100EQ Accident

Monday, December 8th, 2014

Posted December 8, 2014

This is the second time this pilot has crashed at KGAI.  The first time was 06/17/2010.  N700ZR report from the NTSB Probable Cause page:

The pilot of the single-engine turboprop was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight and cancelled his IFR flight plan after being cleared for a visual approach to the destination airport. He flew a left traffic pattern for runway 32, a 4,202-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The pilot reported that the airplane crossed the runway threshold at 81 knots and touched down normally, with the stall warning horn sounding. The airplane subsequently drifted left and the pilot attempted to correct with right rudder input; however, the airplane continued to drift to the left side of the runway. The pilot then initiated a go-around and cognizant of risk of torque roll at low speeds did not apply full power. The airplane climbed to about 10 feet above the ground. At that time, the airplane was in a 20-degree left bank and the pilot applied full right aileron input to correct. The airplane then descended in a left turn, the pilot retarded the throttle, and braced for impact. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the airplane traveled about 100 feet off the left side of the runway, nosed down in mud, and came to rest in trees. Examination of the wreckage by the inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilot report any. The reported wind, about the time of the accident, was from 310 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s failure to maintain aircraft control while performing a go-around.

Here is the NTSB factual report from the above accident:

The pilot of the single-engine turboprop was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight and cancelled his IFR flight plan after being cleared for a visual approach to the destination airport. He flew a left traffic pattern for runway 32, a 4,202-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The pilot reported that the airplane crossed the runway threshold at 81 knots and touched down normally, with the stall warning horn sounding. The airplane subsequently drifted left and the pilot attempted to correct with right rudder input; however, the airplane continued to drift to the left side of the runway. The pilot then initiated a go-around and cognizant of risk of torque roll at low speeds did not apply full power. The airplane climbed to about 10 feet above the ground. At that time, the airplane was in a 20-degree left bank and the pilot applied full right aileron input to correct. The airplane then descended in a left turn, the pilot retarded the throttle, and braced for impact. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the airplane traveled about 100 feet off the left side of the runway, nosed down in mud, and came to rest in trees. Examination of the wreckage by the inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilot report any. The reported wind, about the time of the accident, was from 310 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots. Updated on Jun 16 2010 11:08PM

On his second and final accident at KGAI the winds were from the northeast and he was landing on runway 14. He was landing with a tailwind.  I am going to speculate that in the December 8, 2014 accident that one or both of the engines went into reverse thrust, either pilot commanded or by a system malfunction.  Based on the facts from his first accident at KGAI and my experience in jets and turbo-props I suspect that he may have been high and fast since he was landing with a tailwind and put one or both engines in reverse thrust to compensate and then lost control.  This is also based on eyewitness reports of seeing the aircraft in a 90 degree bank and then on its back (upside down).

NTSB Identification: ERA10CA155

ERA10CA155

November/December Newsletter 2014

Monday, December 8th, 2014

Welcome to our November/December 2014 newsletter.  As you browse through the “new” Flymall you’ll find a lot of useful information for the aviation enthusiasts as well as for the collector car enthusiasts.  If you would like to advertise your business on Flymall.org please contact us at harry@flymall.org.

We have a nice American General AA1 Yankee for sale. This aircraft can be purchased for under $20,000.00 USD.  For details see: http://flymall.org/magento/index.php/used-aircraft/american-general-aa1-yankee-n6116l.html

In general aircraft sales are up.  If an aircraft is priced right it’s only on the market a few weeks.  Our last aircraft that we sold was on the market 3 weeks before it sold.

Over the years Flymall.org has changed into a wheels & wings site.  And as some of you may know we have an interest in rare European 3 wheel vehicles.  We recently purchased a 1912 Auto Carrier Delivery Box Van and it has been in the shop working out some fuel and ignition problems.  After several weeks we finally got it running.  Here is a YouTube video of it running:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HNTCIesKhI&list=UUuPM7ZtUwcLt_-UhbpJFOCA.  For more information on this rare vehicle visit the wheels and wings page of Flymall.org and click on the Car Show icon.   If you have an aircraft, collector car/motorcycle, or other vehicle that you would like displayed in our car show section contact Harry.  It’s free to list a vehicle in this section.  We also have options for listing a vehicle or aircraft for sale on the Flymall. Contact us for details.

For daily news and to follow Harry’s wheels and wings adventures you can connect with him on Facebook (FB icon on the bottom of the Flymall.org pages) or under our forum Harry maintains a blog located under the Laytonsville cruise in section.  The forum is found on the Flymall.org home page.

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