Plane Crash – N100EQ Accident

Posted December 8, 2014

This is the second time this pilot has crashed at KGAI.  The first time was 06/17/2010.  N700ZR report from the NTSB Probable Cause page:

The pilot of the single-engine turboprop was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight and cancelled his IFR flight plan after being cleared for a visual approach to the destination airport. He flew a left traffic pattern for runway 32, a 4,202-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The pilot reported that the airplane crossed the runway threshold at 81 knots and touched down normally, with the stall warning horn sounding. The airplane subsequently drifted left and the pilot attempted to correct with right rudder input; however, the airplane continued to drift to the left side of the runway. The pilot then initiated a go-around and cognizant of risk of torque roll at low speeds did not apply full power. The airplane climbed to about 10 feet above the ground. At that time, the airplane was in a 20-degree left bank and the pilot applied full right aileron input to correct. The airplane then descended in a left turn, the pilot retarded the throttle, and braced for impact. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the airplane traveled about 100 feet off the left side of the runway, nosed down in mud, and came to rest in trees. Examination of the wreckage by the inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilot report any. The reported wind, about the time of the accident, was from 310 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot’s failure to maintain aircraft control while performing a go-around.

Here is the NTSB factual report from the above accident:

The pilot of the single-engine turboprop was on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight and cancelled his IFR flight plan after being cleared for a visual approach to the destination airport. He flew a left traffic pattern for runway 32, a 4,202-foot-long, 75-foot-wide, asphalt runway. The pilot reported that the airplane crossed the runway threshold at 81 knots and touched down normally, with the stall warning horn sounding. The airplane subsequently drifted left and the pilot attempted to correct with right rudder input; however, the airplane continued to drift to the left side of the runway. The pilot then initiated a go-around and cognizant of risk of torque roll at low speeds did not apply full power. The airplane climbed to about 10 feet above the ground. At that time, the airplane was in a 20-degree left bank and the pilot applied full right aileron input to correct. The airplane then descended in a left turn, the pilot retarded the throttle, and braced for impact. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that the airplane traveled about 100 feet off the left side of the runway, nosed down in mud, and came to rest in trees. Examination of the wreckage by the inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, nor did the pilot report any. The reported wind, about the time of the accident, was from 310 degrees at 10 knots, gusting to 15 knots. Updated on Jun 16 2010 11:08PM

On his second and final accident at KGAI the winds were from the northeast and he was landing on runway 14. He was landing with a tailwind.  I am going to speculate that in the December 8, 2014 accident that one or both of the engines went into reverse thrust, either pilot commanded or by a system malfunction.  Based on the facts from his first accident at KGAI and my experience in jets and turbo-props I suspect that he may have been high and fast since he was landing with a tailwind and put one or both engines in reverse thrust to compensate and then lost control.  This is also based on eyewitness reports of seeing the aircraft in a 90 degree bank and then on its back (upside down).

NTSB Identification: ERA10CA155

ERA10CA155

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5 Comments to Plane Crash – N100EQ Accident

  1. by hkraemer

    On December 8, 2014 at 6:58 pm

    It should be noted that runway 32 is a right hand pattern (strike one).

  2. by Pat

    On December 8, 2014 at 7:01 pm

    The NTSB should be able to determine this cause easily–same with bird strike. Other possible cause was icing.

  3. by hkraemer

    On December 8, 2014 at 7:11 pm

    If anything he would have drifted to the right of the runway (strike two). Basically the winds were down the runway, there should have been no drifting at all. Poor piloting.

  4. by Debi

    On December 10, 2014 at 9:36 am

    If the winds were out of the NE, would that be NNE or ENE? if you listen to Live ATC, GAI was indeed using 14 at the time, so it may very well have been a xwind. And, his two last transmissions were “straight in for 1-4”. And, was Rosenberg actually at the controls, or was he a passenger? It DOES sound like he pulled the power too soon, coming in too fast. The NTSB also said the stall warning can be heard a full 20 seconds before impact. That’s enough time to spool up more power, but if he felt he was too fast, why did he let so much time go by before taking some kind of action? I still think GAI needs a longer runway. Might have prevented this guy’s last two accidents.

  5. by Harry Kraemer

    On December 10, 2014 at 10:24 am

    The NTSB released their findings from the flight data recorders. It was pilot error. He got too slow and stalled the plane on short final.

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